White Marble Alternatives for Kitchen Counters: Part Two

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KitchenDavid Piscuskas kitchen, Photographed by Nikolas Koenig for Architectural Digest

The night before  I had what was supposed to be my final counter measure for my quartz countertops (they need to come back one more time, argh!), I had what was hopefully my final freak out over my color/product decision.

While I didn’t end up swaying from my initial pick of Yukon Blanco, it certainly didn’t help that a bunch of folks had recently posted a bunch of lovely photos of projects using my runner-up choice, Silestone Lagoon.  And to compound things, two quartz manufacturers have come out with new marble-like products that look really, really promising.

Because I know a lot of you are just as obsessive about kitchen design as I am, I’m doing one more post of marble alternatives to include some photos from various projects around the World Wide Web as well as the new products.

Nine and Sixteen Silestone LagoonPhoto by Tessa of Nine + Sixteeen

This photo definitely made me make consider switching to Silestone Lagoon.  Tessa from Nine + Sixteen put together a gorgeous kitchen with  Lagoon counters.  She’s got plenty of other shots of her counters on her site, so head on over if you’re interested.  It’s one of the few finished kitchen projects that I’ve seen posted online using Lagoon, so it’s especially helpful if it’s one of your quartz contenders.

And a bunch of the ladies over at Gardenweb used Lagoon for bathroom vanities.  As you can see, Lagoon definitely reads a bit darker in the artificial/low light.

Silestone Lagoon 1Photo via Gardenweb

Silestone Lagoon 2Photo via Gardenweb

And I also got my hands on a sample of a soon-to-be released HanStone quartz called Tranquility.  It’s a bright white with pretty obvious grey veining.  Here’s a photo that I found online of a slab.

HanStone Tranquility SlabBecause monitors are show color so differently, I wasn’t sure how it’d compare to some of the other marble-like quartz products, like Cambria Torquay and Silestone Lagoon.  So I took a comparison shot with some of the other quartz samples I had lying around.

White Marble AlternativesI’m not sure if you’ll be able to tell from the photo, but the Tranquility background is white, white, white.  It made Cambria Torquay, which I’d previously thought of as being very bright, look downright dingy in comparison.  Tranquility was totally free of those grey speckled resin bits that turn some people off from quartz, although it definitely may be too stark for some.

Tranquility would really work well if you like the bright, bright white quartzes (like Cambria White Cliff, Silestone White Zeus Extreme, or Caesarstone Pure White) but want to add a little interest with veining.   My first reaction was that it would be really great in a modern kitchen.

HanStone TranquilityPhoto via HanStone

Yeah, kinda like that.  Doesn’t it look a little bit like quartzite in that photo?  Regardless, I’m a fan.  It’s definitely one of the most natural looking  veining that I’ve seen in any of the quartz products that I’ve seen.

And Caesarstone also introduced recently another marble-like quartz to their collection.  This one is called Frosty Carrina, which they describe as a beautiful soft ivory white with delicate powdery grey veins.

5141-FROSTY-CARRINAPhoto via My Doma

5141Photo via Caesarstone

Definitely more subtle- and softer- than the Tranquility.  But  gorgeous as well.

And here’s a photo of it in a completed kitchen.  Gotta love those ladies (and gents) over at Gardenweb.  They are always on top of the new home design products and appliances.

Frosty CarrinaPhotos via Gardenweb

A bunch of folks on the Gardenweb forum had a bunch of photos of samples of the Frosty Carrina as well.  If you’re interested, definitely hop on over at Gardenweb to check them out.

As much as I love looking at beautiful photos of kitchens, I’m hoping that the next photos of kitchens that you see around here will be mine… I’m anxious to get this thing wrapped up.

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